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The Epistemological Turn: Technology, Bricolage and Design
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The Epistemological Turn: Technology, Bricolage and Design

The rapid development of technology – especially of information and communication technology – and the recognition of the essential complexity of most systems and phenomena are producing a series of crucial consequences, both theoretical and practical, among which the renunciation of the dream of perfect rationality and perfect control.
Rethinking Art as Intimate Science: Climate Art as a Hard Humanity
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Rethinking Art as Intimate Science: Climate Art as a Hard Humanity

Re-reading the “Origin of the Species” by Darwin, on its 150th anniversary, one is struck by the lucidity and humility of the argumentation as well as the transformative power of its conclusions. Yet the scientific theory of evolution is still not widely understood or accepted by most people. The climate on our planet has never been stable, and climate variations have been one of the drivers of the evolution of the species on our planet.

Bio Art

Bio art is a new direction in contemporary art that manipulates the processes of life. Invariably, bio art employs one or more of the following approaches: 1) The coaching of biomaterials into specific inert shapes or behaviors; 2) the unusual or subversive use of biotech tools and processes; 3) the invention or transformation of living organisms with or without social or environmental integration.

Political Ecology And Our Rendezvous With Death

Consider the story of the soldier who meets Death at a crossing of the marketplace, and he believes he saw him make a menacing gesture in his direction. He rushes to the king’s palace and asks the king for his best horse in order that he might flee during the night far from Death, as far as Samarkand. Upon which the king summons Death to the palace and reproaches him for having frightened one of his best servants. ‘I didn’t mean to frighten him. It was just that I was surprised to see this soldi...

The car of the future

The "Car of the Future" is a Transformer (movie toys and action figures; device that transfers electrical energy between circuits) that changes its shape. This could be done with mechanical, electronic, and electromechanical technologies. Smaller modular units of the car, perhaps pods belonging to individuals, will combine together to form social vehicles.

Interview with Luis Miguel Girão

Interview with Roberta Buiani

Interview with Bill Seaman

Interview with Roger Malina

Interview with Pavel Smetana

Interview with Christa Sommerer

Interview with Annick Bureaud

Interview with Leonel Moura

Interview with Nina Czegledy

Interview with Alberto Abruzzese (Italiano)

Interview with Stelarc

Interview with Derrick de Kerckhove

Interview with Margarete Jahrmann

Interview with Jaromil

Interview with Laura Beloff

Interview with Alan Shapiro