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Useless Utilities

The behaviour of software companies, jealously guarding copyright of their expensive products is not usually associated with artistic approaches to making software, but in these cases it does work both conceptually (forcing the user to pay clearly defines this as "not just art"), and economically, allowing them to maintain financial independence from corporate, art-world or state funding. Using these tools, and certainly programming them does address problems of authorship and intellectual prope...

Lev Manovich: how to speak new media

We can talk about a painting using such terms as 'composition', 'flatness', 'colour scheme' and we can talk about a film using such terms as 'plot', 'cinematography', and 'editing.' With new media, the existing discourse focuses on 2 extremes: either purely industrial terms such as 'Flash animation' or 'JPEG image' (which all describe software used and don't tell you much about the work's poetics and the user's experience of it), or rather abstract theoretical terms created during the previous h...

N is for Nature

It is only when second nature develops that nature appears as a concept. Once the techniques are in place for making nature into a resource, for trapping or taming it, an appreciation arises for nature in its raw state, a state that only appears at the point where it is no longer a general condition. What cultures represent to themselves as nature is always a world we have lost. Nature, which appears as an origin, appears only retroactively, as it disappears. The lost world of nature exercises a...

Software Art

Since more than a decade, festivals, awards, exhibitions and publications exist for various forms of computer art: computer music, computer graphics, electronic literature, Net Art and computer-controlled interactive installations, to name only a few, each of them with its own institutions and discourse. Classifications like the above show that attention is usually being paid to how, i.e. in which medium, digital artworks present themselves to the audience, externally. They also show that digita...

Telepresence: Invocation and Evocation

What has changed with computer-based media forms, including advanced teleconferencing, robotic telepresence, and virtual reality games, is a tighter integration between invocational and evocational components. The methods that address things and call them in from out of view (the invocations), and those that give them form (the evocations), have converged. [...] But what is most unsettling about experiencing new systems of telepresence, at least until they are rendered natural by familiarity, is...

Interview with Bruno D'Amore

Interview with Elif Ayiter

Interview with Luis Miguel Girão

Interview with Roberta Buiani

Interview with Bill Seaman

Interview with Roger Malina

Interview with Pavel Smetana

Interview with Christa Sommerer

Interview with Annick Bureaud

Interview with Leonel Moura

Interview with Nina Czegledy

Interview with Alberto Abruzzese (Italiano)

Interview with Stelarc

Interview with Derrick de Kerckhove

Interview with Margarete Jahrmann

Interview with Jaromil

Interview with Laura Beloff

Interview with Alan Shapiro